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Now accepting orders for April, 2019 construction. On the Blog page, use the Search feature in this header bar to find a topic.
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Bee Tree Hexagonal Hive

Bee Tree Hexagonal Hive

Obviously, honey bees love hexagons.  That's why I built this hexagonal bait hive.  It has 40 liters of interior space (per Dr. Seeley's research).  It has an entrance hole that has an area of 2 square inches and is located below the brood nest (both characteristics also in response to Dr. Seeley's research). The hive is built of 2 inch thick western red cedar which is about 5 or 6 times as insulative as 3/4 inch pine, and is also far more hygroscopic than pine.  In addition, the interior surfaces of the hive are rough to help promote a propolis coating. It...

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The Fruit of a Honey Bee Colony is not Honey, it's a Swarm

The Fruit of a Honey Bee Colony is not Honey, it's a Swarm

The fruit of an apple tree is not, ultimately, an apple... it's an orchard. An apple is food for many creatures, including humans, but the ultimate purpose of an apple is to carry the genetics of the apple tree and to produce an orchard.  The end goal of the apple tree's fruit is the propagation of the species. Likewise, the fruit of a honey bee colony is not honey, it is a swarm.  If the analogy holds, honey is more like the sap of an apple tree.  It carries the nutrients that feed the organism.  But the core, driving goal of a honey bee...

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More Research Showing the Importance of Propolis in the Hive

More Research Showing the Importance of Propolis in the Hive

"In fact, leaving lumber naturally rough, with no planning or sanding, would provide a simple and effective surface for boosting propolis, they write." Read the entire article in Entomology Today HERE. Read about why I use rough-cut, western red cedar HERE. And more research HERE.

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Natural Bee Husbandry - an international magazine for preservation beekeepers

Natural Bee Husbandry - an international magazine for preservation beekeepers

I'm very honored to have another article published in the international, preservation beekeeping magazine Natural Bee Husbandry. The actual article can be found HERE. This magazine is published by the Natural Beekeeping Trust and can be subscribed to HERE. 

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What Are Beekeepers For?

What Are Beekeepers For?

A great article by the Natural Beekeeping Trust. "Any activities we engage in as beekeepers to protect the colonies in our care from parasites, virus attacks and diseases are measures that delay if not prevent the development of a natural gene pool of honeybees in the world. As long as medication dependent bees predominate in any given region, the evolvement of good genetic pools is actively hindered. Wild living honeybees are vital." Full article HERE.

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